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6 posts in Partner Highlight

Chasing Ice Film Screening and Panel on November 28th

Join EarthLab and the Simpson Center for the Humanities for a screening of Chasing Ice, as part of the Anthropocene Film Salon series. CIG’s Heidi Roop and the Simpson Center’s Jesse Oak Tayler will be on hand after the film for a panel discussion. The goal of this event is to foster mutual learning and catalyze new, cross-cutting collaborations to address the unique social-ecological challenges of the Anthropocene.

Details

What: Chasing Ice, a film by Jeff Orlowski

When: November 28th, 5:30 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.

Where: Fisheries Sciences lobby and auditorium (room 102), University of Washington, Seattle

Panelists:
Jesse Oak Tayler, Associate Professor of English and Co-director, Anthropocene Research Cluster (Simpson Center for the Humanities)
Heidi Roop, Lead Scientist for Science Communication, Climate Impacts Group (EarthLab) 

RSVP to Attend

New look for the NW Climate Adaptation Science Center website

The Northwest Climate Adaptation Science Center (NW CASC) recently launched a new website! The new site offers improved navigation and usability and more dedicated space for highlighting NW CASC’s science, research fellows and partners. Check out their new look and learn more about their work increasing climate resilience around the Northwest: https://nwcasc.uw.edu/

  

Visit the new site

Northwest Climate Adaptation Science Center is Hiring!

The Northwest Climate Adaptation Science Center, a program of the Climate Impacts Group, is seeking qualified applicants for their Actionable Science Postdoctoral Fellow position. The Actionable Science Fellow will play a leading role in the NW CASC’s efforts to foster co-production of decision-relevant science across the Northwest. Preference will be given to applications received by September 5, 2018. 

Apply Today!

Understanding Recent Warming in Washington State

Wondering about the new analysis that finds average temperatures in Washington have warmed more slowly than any other state in the country? Want to know why? Kim Malcolm of KUOW talked with CIG’s Joe Casola and the Seattle Times interviewed Washington State Climatologist, Nick Bond, to learn more about the role of the Pacific Ocean and why timescales matter when considering climate trends. Listen to and read their insights here:

CIG’s Deputy Director, Joe Casola, on KUOW.
WA State Climatologist, Nick Bond, in the Seattle Times.

“Bond said he’s not surprised to hear that Washington’s climate hasn’t warmed quite as much as other states in the past 3o years. 

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Upcoming lectures as part of WA Sea Grant director search

Please join Washington Sea Grant and the UW College of the Environment for four public seminars presented by candidates for the position of Director of Washington Sea Grant. Each candidate will address the questions: “What does success look like for Washington Sea Grant over the next 5-10 years, and how would your specific experiences and approaches enable us to get there together? All seminars will be held in Fishery Sciences Building, Room 102 on the University of Washington Seattle campus. Remote participation also available. 

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CIG supports new guidance for integrating climate change into toxic clean-up planning

The Department of Ecology just published new guidance to help cleanup project managers assess the risks posed by our changing climate to a range of toxic cleanup sites across Washington state. This new guidance, which includes tools for conducting site-specific vulnerability assessments, aims to help managers identify adaptation measures that will increase the climate-resilience of cleanup sites. The Climate Impacts Group was consulted in the creation of this guidance and has provided assistance in the development of communications materials.

For the complete guidance document please see: Adaptation Strategies for Resilient Cleanup Remedies: A Guide for Cleanup Project Managers to Increase the Resilience of Toxic Cleanup Sites to the Impacts from Climate Change. 

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