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New look for the NW Climate Adaptation Science Center website

The Northwest Climate Adaptation Science Center (NW CASC) recently launched a new website! The new site offers improved navigation and usability and more dedicated space for highlighting NW CASC’s science, research fellows and partners. Check out their new look and learn more about their work increasing climate resilience around the Northwest: https://nwcasc.uw.edu/

  

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Upcoming Webinar: Climate Resilience in Flood Risk Management – Culvert Design

Join CIG’s Guillaume Mauger and the Washington Silver Jackets on Wednesday, September 19th  at 10 AM for a webinar on Climate Resilience in Flood Risk Management: Culvert Replacement. Washington state is currently mandated to replace thousands of culverts that create barriers to fish passage, resulting in a substantial reduction in available habitat. Given the scale of this investment, WA Department of Fish and Wildlife and UW Climate Impacts Group have begun to assess the potential impacts of climate change on culvert design. George Wilhere, a senior research scientist in the habitat program at WDFW, and Guillaume Mauger, a research scientist in climate science at CIG, will review recent research, describe two new online tools, and discuss potential applications. 

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New Chapter for Climate Impacts Group Research Scientist Se-Yeun Lee

After more than five years as a Research Scientist with the Climate Impacts Group, Se-Yeun Lee is leaving to start a new chapter as a full-time instructor at Seattle University.

During her time at Climate Impacts Group, Se-Yeun has been involved in interdisciplinary research focusing on understanding and modeling the complex interactions between climate, hydrology and natural resource management. With a Ph.D. in Civil and Environmental Engineering from the University of Washington, research interests in climate change impacts on hydrology, and a drive to work directly with managers and decision-makers, Se-Yeun’s work has greatly contributed to our mission of advancing understanding of climate risks and building regional climate resilience.  

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Upcoming Washington Wildfire Smoke & Health Symposium

Please join us on October 30, 2018 for the Wildfire Smoke Risk Communication Stakeholder Symposium. Hosted by the University of Washington ColLABorative on Extreme Event Resilience, Program on Climate Change, and Climate Impacts Group, the symposium aims to bring together the University of Washington climate and health research community with local, state, tribal, and federal practitioners working on wildfire smoke and health issues in Washington State.

 

The symposium will convene regional stakeholders to share lessons learned from the 2017 and 2018 wildfire seasons, and to foster academic-practice partnerships to address existing challenges related to wildfire smoke and health in Washington State. 

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New Report Released on the Disproportionate Impacts of Climate Change Facing Communities in Washington State

The Climate Impacts Group, in collaboration with the UW Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, Urban@UW and Front and Center, has just release a new report that explores who is at risk in Washington state from climate impacts, and why. This report strives to clarify how communities of color, indigenous peoples and communities with lower incomes may be exposed differently to climate-related hazards in Washington state and how factors like race/ethnicity, wealth, income, level of education and health status affect the ability to cope with climate impacts, or related harm. 

Learn More & Download the Report

Northwest Climate Adaptation Science Center is Hiring!

The Northwest Climate Adaptation Science Center, a program of the Climate Impacts Group, is seeking qualified applicants for their Actionable Science Postdoctoral Fellow position. The Actionable Science Fellow will play a leading role in the NW CASC’s efforts to foster co-production of decision-relevant science across the Northwest. Preference will be given to applications received by September 5, 2018. 

Apply Today!

Sea-level rise report contains best projections yet for Washington’s coasts

One certainty under climate change is that global ocean levels are rising. A new report led by Washington Sea Grant and the University of Washington’s Climate Impacts Group provides the clearest picture yet of what to expect in Washington state. The full report is available here on the CIG site & here on the Coastal Hazards Resilience Network. 

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Harriet Morgan discusses new sea level rise report on KNKX

A new report from Washington’s “Coastal Resilience Project” provides new projections of sea level rise for 171 different sites and communities around coastal Washington state. 

Listen to the Story!

Crystal Raymond on King 5 discussing innovative climate & forestry initiative

Crystal Raymond was featured on King 5 as part of an innovative climate and forest resilience project underway in King County. This project, which was part of her previous position at Seattle City Light, is a collaborative effort with the Mountains to Sound Greenway Trust, Seattle Public Utilities, the Wildlife Conversation Society and the Northwest Natural Resource Group.

  

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Upcoming webinar with CIG’s Andrew Shirk: Developing a Dynamic Spatial Tool to Support Collaborative Regional Adaptation Planning in Cascadia

Join us on July 25th for a webinar on “Developing a Dynamic Spatial Tool to Support Collaborative Regional Adaptation Planning in Cascadia“ hosted by the Great Northern Landscape Conservation Cooperative.

Date and Time: July 25, 2018 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm MDT / 11:00 am – 12:00 pm PDT

Presenters: Andrew Shirk, University of Washington Climate Impacts Group; Jen Watkins Conservation Northwest and facilitator of the Cascadia Partner Forum; and Carly Vynne, Osprey Insights

Register for webinar 

Webinar Overview: Every day we are making decisions that will affect our region—and our options—well into the future. From how we choose to grow as our population expands to what crops we plant – our decisions matter and they must respond to the needs of today and tomorrow. 

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