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UW tools help Pacific Northwest and Western tribes plan for climate change impacts

Our recently-released Tribal Vulnerability Assessment Resources were featured in the Inlander. As the natural world responds to climate change, American Indian tribes across the country are grappling with how to plan for a future that balances inevitable change with protecting the resources vital to their cultural traditions. The Climate Impacts Group and regional tribal partners have developed a collection of resources that may be useful to tribes at any stage in the process of evaluating their vulnerability to climate change. The resources, mainly online, include a climate tool that provides interactive summaries of projected climate change on annual precipitation, stream temperatures, growing season, fire danger and other variables. 

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Western Washington’s wildfire risk is increasing

King5 featured our Managing Western WA Wildfire Risk in a Changing Climate workshop. “The risk is going up, and there’s a real need to better understand what’s going to happen,” said Amy Snover, Director of the University of Washington Climate Impacts Group. The event on December 3rd, 2018 was hosted by the Tulalip Tribes, Puget Sound Preparedness Collaborative, Climate Impacts Group and Northwest Climate Adaptation Science Center.

  

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KIRO Radio Interview with Amy Snover

Amy Snover sat down with Dave Ross at KIRO radio to talk about the recently-released 4th National Climate Assessment. Snover discusses what a changing climate means for the Northwest and describes why it’s not too late to prevent the most serious impacts of human caused climate change. 

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Mapping Future Flood Risk – project update and blog post

CIG research scientist, Guillaume Mauger, recently completed a project mapping the future flood risk in the Stillaguamish and Snohomish Rivers. This project explores two key questions: 1) what is the combined effect of sea level rise and changes in river flooding, and 2) where will the extra water go? 

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CIG’s Heidi Roop featured in National Geographic

CIG scientist Heidi Roop recently spoke with National Geographic about the 4th National Climate Assessment and what it means for the Northwest, and our nation. “The message is it’s us, humans, changing the climate,” says Heidi Roop. It’s already affecting “many things we take advantage of every day—our wastewater management, our natural environment, our power generation, our roadways, our food. But the report highlights the other part of that: that people are doing something, and there’s hope.” 

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A NW Climate Change Conversation on KUOW

CIG’s Heidi Roop sat down with Bill Radke on KUOW’s The Record to discuss the 4th National Climate Assessment, what climate change means for us in the Northwest and the many relevant actions and adaptations underway across the region. 

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Support CIG’s Mission

Did you know you can help to support the work of the Climate Impacts Group? Donations of any size help support cutting-edge climate research, innovative community engagement & valuable hands-on training opportunities for students. Donate today:  

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Volume 2 of the 4th National Climate Assessment Now Available

On November 23rd, the U.S. Global Change Research Program released Volume 2 of the 4th National Climate Assessment – a congressionally-mandated synthesis of climate science and the observed and projected impacts of climate change across the United States. This report is the result of a three-year effort by hundreds of experts around the country. The Climate Impacts Group served as a co-author on the Northwest chapter.

For the Northwest region, the key messages from the report include:

Key Message #1: Natural Resource Economy

“Climate change is already affecting the Northwest’s diverse natural resources, which support sustainable livelihoods; provide a robust foundation for rural, tribal, and Indigenous communities; and strengthen local economies. 

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CIG-OWSC Trends Tool Featured in GeekWire

The Climate Impacts Group recently partnered with the Office of the Washington State Climatologist and data visualization software company, Tableau, to develop a climate trends analysis tool for Washington, Idaho, Oregon and western Montana. CIG project lead, Heidi Roop, hopes this tool will help communities and organizations better communicate and understand regional trends in climate across the Northwest. 

Learn more about the tool

Chasing Ice Film Screening and Panel on November 28th

Join EarthLab and the Simpson Center for the Humanities for a screening of Chasing Ice, as part of the Anthropocene Film Salon series. CIG’s Heidi Roop and the Simpson Center’s Jesse Oak Tayler will be on hand after the film for a panel discussion. The goal of this event is to foster mutual learning and catalyze new, cross-cutting collaborations to address the unique social-ecological challenges of the Anthropocene.

Details

What: Chasing Ice, a film by Jeff Orlowski

When: November 28th, 5:30 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.

Where: Fisheries Sciences lobby and auditorium (room 102), University of Washington, Seattle

Panelists:
Jesse Oak Tayler, Associate Professor of English and Co-director, Anthropocene Research Cluster (Simpson Center for the Humanities)
Heidi Roop, Lead Scientist for Science Communication, Climate Impacts Group (EarthLab) 

RSVP to Attend
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