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Seattle Thinks It Knows Rain. Climate Change Begs to Differ.

This article, featuring CIG science and comment from Research Scientist Guillaume Mauger, considers climate change, extreme weather, and if Seattle’s infrastructure is ready.

This article was also published in the Pacific Standard

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Upcoming Webinar: Stream Temperature Handbook Update (May 3rd)

Join the Climate Impacts Group and partners for an upcoming webinar on May 3rd from 11AM- 12PM PT about our collaborative Stream Temperature Handbook project. The Stream Temperature Handbook is designed to assist land, water, and habitat managers as they prepare for future climate impacts and will include brief summaries of available data sources and models, a user-oriented guide to help readers select appropriate data/models that fit their decision needs, and a set of case studies. This work is supported by the USGS NW Climate Adaptation Science Center, and includes partners from the USGS and NOAA.

Register Today!

Upcoming Actionable Science Webinar: Introduction to Collaborative Research Methods (May 1st)

The Northwest Climate Science Center’s next Actionable Climate Science Skills-building Webinar is Tuesday, May 1st at 11:00 AM (PT)! Don’t miss the chance to register for “An Introduction to Collaborative Research Methods” with Alison Meadow from the University of Arizona. Space is limited!

 

Register Today!

CIG Science at Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference 2018

Attending the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference April 4-6th, 2018? Be sure to check out the range of CIG science being shared at this gathering. CIG researchers will cover topics including sea-level rise in Washington, culverts and climate change, flood-plain management, changing stream temperatures, mapping and more!

Here is a complete list of presentations, posters and snapshot talks that include researchers from the Climate Impacts Group:

Oral Presentations

Sea level rise guidance for nearshore habitat restoration in Puget Sound

Harriet Morgan, Nicole Faghin, Jay Krienitz, Tish Conway-Cranos

4 April 2018 • 10:45 – 11:00 AM

Sea level rise guidance for Assessing harmful algal bloom risk in Puget Sound: a coupled modeling-data analysis approach

Dana Woodruff, Taiping Wang, Stephanie Moore, Zhaoqing Yang, Ning Sun, Jerry Borchert, Audrey Coyne, Guillaume Mauger, Valerie Cullinan

4 April 2018 • 1:30 – 1:45 PM

Space matters: incorporating mechanistically determined spatial patterns into projected impacts of climate change on stream temperature

Se-Yeun Lee, Aimee H. 

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What climate change means to our crucial snowpack

Our colleagues in the Office of the Washington State Climatologist at the University of Washington recently wrote an excellent Op-Ed on the importance and future of snowpack in the Pacific Northwest in a warming climate. “The bottom line is that year-to-year variability will continue to be the dominant effect on our snowpack over at least the next decade or two. At some point, however, these variations will be overwhelmed by a warming of the Pacific Northwest. Years such as 2015, specifically its warm winter temperatures, will become more the rule rather than the exception by about the 2050s.”

Read the Op-Ed

New Actionable Science Skills-Building Webinar Series

The Northwest Climate Science Center has organized a new Actionable Climate Science Skills-Building Webinar Series. This series is designed to help those engaged in climate science research better understand the range of approaches for developing actionable science. Each webinar will explore ways to support effective collaborations between scientific researchers and natural resource managers. The first webinar will be held on April 3rd, 2018 and will feature Amy Snover & Meade Krosby.

 

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Climate Impacts Group welcomes new climate adaptation specialist

The Climate Impacts Group is excited to welcome Dr. Crystal Raymond to the team as our new Climate Adaptation Specialist. Crystal has a strong background working within organizations to translate climate risks to management concerns and incorporate climate change risk reduction perspectives into decision-making.

“Crystal’s experience doing on-the-ground climate adaptation work with federal agencies, regional collaboratives, and local government, combined with her strong grounding in research science and terrific communication skills, will be of broad benefit to our region,” says Amy Snover, Director. “She brings practical insight into the realities of climate risk management within complex organizations with multiple competing pressures and priorities. 

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College of the Environment Seminar Series on Critical Interdisciplinary Problems

UW students, faculty and staff are invited to attend the inaugural UW College of the Environment Critical Interdisciplinary Problems Seminar Series lecture on March 6th at 4:30 PM in the SAFS Auditorium.

The theme of the inaugural seminar is “West Coast Wildfires: What are the Key Scientific Issues?’. After a year of major wildfires from British Columbia to southern California, with dozens of deaths and damage in the tens of billions of dollars, western wildfires are clearly one of the key environmental issues for the region.  This seminar will explore what we know regarding the origins of the problem and discuss some of the key scientific, technical, and societal issues that must be addressed. 

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New CIG Report: Nooksack Indian Tribe Natural Resources Climate Change Vulnerability Assessment

CIG researchers Harriet Morgan and Meade Krosby recently completed an natural resources vulnerability assessment for the Nooksack Indian Tribe. Working collaboratively with the Tribe’s Natural Resource staff, CIG evaluated the climate change vulnerability of priority species and habitats for the Tribe. Information provided in this assessment offers a rigorous foundation for future climate adaptation efforts aimed at addressing climate risks to the Nooksack Tribe’s priority species and habitats. You can read more about the project here, download the assessment and explore a range of species-specific factsheets.

  

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Phi Beta Kappa Winter Reception Featuring Amy Snover

Climate Impacts Group Director, Amy Snover, will be featured at the Phi Beta Kappa, UW Chapter Winter Reception on February 15th, 2018 at 5:30 PM. Join for a discussion about navigating the personal, institutional and societal pressures on expression in politically-conflicted contexts.

February 15th, 2018 from 5:30- 7:00 PM | Petersen Room, 4th Floor Allen Library, University of Washington Seattle Campus

RSVP: uwpbk@uw.edu 

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