Stream Temperature Handbook

Full Title

Stream Temperature Handbook: Using Data and Models to Assess Impacts and Adapt to Climate Change

Project Overview

Natural resource managers face significant challenges when applying stream temperature datasets or projections to climate adaptation efforts. In cooperation with local resource managers, CIG is working with colleagues at USGS to develop a handbook that can be used to guide the selection of appropriate stream temperature data and models for specific management questions.

Approach

Our work will involve the following components:

  1. We will engage resource managers and conservation planners to learn about their adaptation efforts, their stream temperature data needs, and the types of data that they are presently using.
  2. Using input from these stakeholders, we will draft the handbook, which will provide a synthesis of applications for existing stream temperature data and modeling and decision trees that connect data/models to specific management questions.
  3. We will engage stakeholders to get feedback about the utility of the handbook.

Application & Products

This work will be summarized in a webinar and report/handbook for natural resources managers who are considering the impacts of climate change on future water quality in the Pacific Northwest

Key Personnel

  • Christian Torgersen (Principal Investigator), USGS Forest & Rangeland Ecosystem Science Center/University of Washington School of Environmental & Forest Sciences
  • Crystal Raymond (Co-Principal Investigator)*, University of Washington
  • Aimee Fullerton (Co-Principal Investigator), NOAA and Northwest Fisheries Science Center
  • Francine Mejia, USGS Forest & Rangeland Ecosystem Science Center/University of Washington School of Environmental & Forest Sciences
  • Zachary Johnson, School of Environmental and Forest Sciences, University of Washington
  • Andrew Shirk, University of Washington*
  • Se-Yeun Lee, Seattle University

* Indicates CIG Personnel or CIG Affiliate(s)

Funder(s)

Northwest Climate Science Center

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